Method

Click On The Arrow Above To hear Rabbi Dolgin Explain His Method

The method will work with any subject and any time amount. We use an example below of the daily daf, which would be an average of two hours per day. An Amud, would be an hour, and 2 Mishnayos might be 15 minutes.

Here's How It Works

  • Day 1 -
    Learn New Daf
  • Day 2 -
    Learn New Daf
    Chazer Yesterday's Daf
  • Day 9 -
    Learn New Daf
    Chazer Yesterday's Daf
    Chazer Last Week's Daf
  • Day 39-
    Learn New Daf
    Chazer Yesterday's Daf
    Chazer Last Week's Daf
    Chazer Last Last Month's Daf
  • Day 129-
    Learn New Daf
    Chazer Yesterday's Daf
    Chazer Last Week's Daf
    Chazer Last Last Month's Daf
    Chazer 3 Months ago Daf
  • Day 366-
    Learn New Daf
    Chazer Yesterday's Daf
    Chazer Last Week's Daf
    Chazer Last Last Month's Daf
    Chazer 3 Months ago Daf
    Chazer Last Years Daf

Learning is the process of taking new information in your working memory and integrating it with existing knowledge in your long-term memory.  Once it’s in long-term memory you can recall it and transfer the knowledge to the real world.

Here’s some basic information about working and long-term memory:

    * Working memory:  Your working memory is good at processing information, but it can only hold so much at one time.  All of your active thinking happens in the working memory.
    * Long-term memory:  Your long-term memory is your storage center and holds your existing knowledge.  In the learning process, you are connecting the new information to prior knowledge.  As you actively process information, you are swapping it between working and long-term memory.

Think of it this way.  Your working memory is like a white board where you can do a lot of calculations and diagramming on the fly.  On the white board, you need space to both write down information (temporary storage) and do your problem-solving (active processing).

The problem is that you only have so much space.  As the white board gets cluttered with information, you run out of room to work.  That means you need to record the important information and free up space to do more work on the white board.

One way to capture the information is to create post-it notes (long-term memory) to record the information on the white board.  Once you you have the notes, you are free to erase the white board and do more work.  And, if you needed to recall what you did earlier, all you have to do is look at one of your notes.

The Rapid E-Learning Blog: Working memory and long-term memory
Design E-Learning for Working Memory

As you go through an E-learning course, what you see and hear enters your working memory where it is temporarily stored.  Your brain actively processes the new information and integrates it with what you have stored in your long-term memory.

So, your brain is doing these things:

   1. Receiving new information
   2. Actively processing the information
   3. Integrating the information with long-term memory

Here’s your brain’s challenge.  Most of us can only hold and process so much data.  For example, it’s not easy solving a math calculation like 219 X 473 in our heads because we have to store information at the same time as we process it.

Your working memory has limited capacity and can only do so much.  This is called the cognitive load.  If you load your working memory with too much information, then there’s no room to process it, which makes it more difficult to recall the information later on.

This is where your E-learning design skills come in.  Instead of just dumping information on the learner, you have an opportunity to guide the learner by structuring your content by how our brains process information.

Basically, these three things have to happen:

   1. Organize Content into Small Chunks.  Structure the new information in small, related chunks so that it is optimized for working memory.  Don’t overload the working memory with irrelevant content.  The brain is sorting and organizing the information.  If it’s not relevant, or there’s too much of it, it interferes with the learning process.
   2. Build Upon Prior Knowledge.  Create processes where the learner can practice using the information in a context that integrates it with prior experience.  Case studies and practices exercises are good because they can be structured to combine the new information with the learner’s current understanding.
   3. Provide Real-World Context.  The goal is to get the learner to pull information out of long-term memory and transfer it to a real world context.  Create exercises and real-world scenarios that help the learner apply the new information into a workplace context.   Problem-solving scenarios help develop thinking skills that can be transferred to the real world.

Short and Long Term Memory

Once a memory is created, it must be stored (no matter how briefly). Many experts think there are three ways we store memories: first in the sensory stage; then in short-term memory; and ultimately, for some memories, in long-term memory. Because there is no need for us to maintain everything in our brain, the different stages of human memory function as a sort of filter that helps to protect us from the flood of information that we're confronted with on a daily basis.

The creation of a memory begins with its perception: The registration of information during perception occurs in the brief sensory stage that usually lasts only a fraction of a second. It's your sensory memory that allows a perception such as a visual pattern, a sound, or a touch to linger for a brief moment after the stimulation is over.

After that first flicker, the sensation is stored in short-term memory. Short-term memory has a fairly limited capacity; it can hold about seven items for no more than 20 or 30 seconds at a time. You may be able to increase this capacity somewhat by using various memory strategies. For example, a ten-digit number such as 8005840392 may be too much for your short-term memory to hold. But divided into chunks, as in a telephone number, 800-584-0392 may actually stay in your short-term memory long enough for you to dial the telephone. Likewise, by repeating the number to yourself, you can keep resetting the short-term memory clock.

Important information is gradually transferred from short-term memory into long-term memory. The more the information is repeated or used, the more likely it is to eventually end up in long-term memory, or to be "retained." (That's why studying helps people to perform better on tests.) Unlike sensory and short-term memory, which are limited and decay rapidly, long-term memory can store unlimited amounts of information indefinitely.

People tend to more easily store material on subjects that they already know something about, since the information has more meaning to them and can be mentally connected to related information that is already stored in their long-term memory. That's why someone who has an average memory may be able to remember a greater depth of information about one particular subject.

Most people think of long-term memory when they think of "memory" itself -- but most experts believe information must first pass through sensory and short-term memory before it can be stored as a long-term memory. To learn how information makes its way out of long-term memory, see the next page. We will explore how memories are recalled and what happens when a memory cannot be retrieved - a phenomenon you might call “forgetting. ”
 

Click here to see an excerpt from a book titled "Improve Your Memory" written David Thomas, a motivational speaker famous for having one of the most powerful memories in history.